Community & Neighborhood Matching Grants Now Available!


from https://www.eugene-or.gov/534/Neighborhood-Matching-Grants

The Neighborhood Matching Grants (NMG) program began in 2000 with the adoption of Council Resolution 4632. In that time we’ve funded 133 projects in our neighborhoods. The benefits of the NMG program go well beyond the financial investment and are an important tool for building community, creating connections and improving our neighborhoods, parks and natural areas.

Beginning July 16 2018, applications for smaller projects, less than $5,000 will be considered by HRNI and other City staff for approval and funding on an ongoing basis until May 1, 2019 (or funding used). Staff involved in the review process will be selected based on the project under consideration.

The review process for large projects ($5,000 – $12,000) will begin January 2019 using the current application and pre-review process which includes evaluation and recommendations from the Department Advisory Committee, and review and approval by City Council with funding available for approved projects on July 1, 2019.

See the Guidelines>>

Submit an Application>>

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Community Arts Grant Program Funded by City of Eugene Cultural Services


Southeast Neighbors

emily proudfoot Art by Emily Proudfoot

The Community Arts Grant is seeking applications through May 6, for accessible, affordable and inclusive projects for local communities with limited exposure to the arts due to ethnicity, economics or disability.

The grant program is funded by the City of Eugene Cultural Services Division and administered by Lane Arts Council. More than $50,000 will be awarded this year.

“We are grateful for the City of Eugene’s ongoing investment in the arts. These projects make Eugene a creative and dynamic place to live,” says Liora Sponko, executive director of Lane Arts Council.

The Community Arts Grant recognizes the expanding role that the arts play in the broader, cultural, social, educational and economic areas of community life. Grant funding will help to ensure diverse and accessible arts opportunities and experiences for Eugene artists, audiences and participants.

Competitive applications include partnerships between arts organizations and community-based organizations that strengthen…

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Community Grant Program


The Oregon Community Foundation’s Community Grant Program addresses community needs and fosters civic leadership and engagement throughout our state. As of November 2014, the application deadlines have changed to January 15 and July 15.

Guiding Principles

  • We believe that creative and sustainable solutions come from people who work in partnership to address common needs and aspirations.
  • We give high priority to investments that create positive, substantive change and attempt to resolve problems at their source.
  • We recognize and respect Oregon’s diverse regions and populations, and we seek to advance equity, diversity and inclusion through our programs.

Program Details

As a responsive arm of OCF, the Community Grant Program awards about 220-240 grants each year, mostly to small- and moderate-size nonprofits. The average grant is $20,000. OCF typically receives 300 to 350 proposals per grant cycle and funds 110 to 120 of these. Concerns central to OCF’s evaluation of proposed projects include:

  • The strength of local support for the project
  • The strength of the applicant organization
  • Whether the project addresses a significant community need

OCF will also consider how well the project fits the following list of funding priorities. Please review the full guidelines, which include tips on submitting a competitive proposal as well as guidance on capacity-building and capital requests.

Health & Wellbeing of Vulnerable Populations (30 to 40 percent of grants)

  1. Improve community-based health and wellness, including oral and mental/behavioral health
  2. Address basic human needs, such as food, housing, and related services
  3. Improve the quality of life, safety and self-sufficiency of at-risk populations

Educational Opportunities & Achievement (30 to 40 percent of grants)

  1. Promote social, emotional and cognitive development of young children, including programs that support and educate parents and efforts that engage volunteers
  2. Expand academic support, mentoring and recreational programs for children and youth, particularly to close the achievement gap
  3. Broaden workplace, career and postsecondary experiences and opportunities for youth
  4. Improve adult literacy, skill development, education and workforce training

Arts & Cultural Organizations (15 to 25 percent of grants)

  1. Strengthen and stabilize arts and cultural nonprofits, and support collaborative efforts
  2. Cultivate and support appreciation of diverse cultures and art forms
  3. Deepen community-based arts education for children and adults
  4. Encourage audience development, particularly to reach underserved populations

Community Livability, Environment & Citizen Engagement (10 to 20 percent of grants)

  1. Promote leadership development, volunteerism, immigrant integration, and civic participation
  2. Support stewardship and appreciation of Oregon’s outdoor spaces and scenic beauty
  3. Address social, economic and environmental challenges or opportunities by bringing together disparate stakeholders
  4. Preserve places essential to communities’ civic and historic identities

Read more…

Eugene Association of Realtors Placemaker Grant


The National Association of Realtors (NAR) offers grant funding for small, community projects to enhance public spaces called Placemaker Grants.

Every community has a variety of public spaces, some of which are noticeable and others which may be hidden. Public places most recognized are parks, streets, boulevards, and plazas. But public spaces are also found in between private spaces such as alleys, neglected courtyards, and stairways. These could be a city’s most underutilized and potentially valuable assets. However, even noticeable public spaces in communities may be unused or underused because of safety concerns or because they have deteriorated — all of which can be improved to increase their usage and usefulness and to strengthen and enrich a community. Placemaking can enhance a public space and make it come to life. You can help by identifying a public place and developing its positive potential so that whole community can benefit.

The Eugene Association of Realtors is looking for ideas for neighborhood projects that can succeed with one of these $500 – $2,500 grants, awarded semi-annually.

Applications must be received by Friday, March 27th, 2015.

Previous Grant Winners

shelter

Placemaking can enhance a public space and make it come to life. You can help by identifying a public place and developing its positive potential so that whole community can benefit.

Traffic-calming Traffic calming measures are design and management strategies to balance street traffic with other uses to help create and preserve a sense of place so that people can safely walk, stroll, meet, play, and shop along and near streets. While we typically associate traffic calming with speed humps or curb extensions that narrow a roadway, creative use of paint or decorative plantings can also make streets safer, as well as enhancing the street space and make it appealing. These projects can help to reduce speeding along residential streets and help remind people they are in a neighborhood full of people — playing children, pets, dog-walkers, bicyclists, and individuals. Street paintings and other unusual visuals and activities — painting on the street, boulevard gardens, sidewalk chalking designs — can create cues that tell drivers to slow down and drive more attentively.

Creative Traffic Calming

Traffic calming measures are design and management strategies to balance street traffic with other uses to help create and preserve a sense of place so that people can safely walk, stroll, meet, play, and shop along and near streets. While we typically associate traffic calming with speed humps or curb extensions that narrow a roadway, creative use of paint or decorative plantings can also make streets safer, as well as enhancing the street space and make it appealing.

These projects can help to reduce speeding along residential streets and help remind people they are in a neighborhood full of people — playing children, pets, dog-walkers, bicyclists, and individuals.

Street paintings and other unusual visuals and activities — painting on the street, boulevard gardens, sidewalk chalking designs — can create cues that tell drivers to slow down and drive more attentively.

Before & After

NAR’s Placemaking Initiative encourages REALTOR® associations, and their members, to engage in Placemaking in their communities. Many Placemaking activities, often referred to as Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper, are small, inexpensive, and incremental community projects.They do not need to cost a lot of money to get off the ground. Nor do they need to take a lot of time to plan and complete. But, these smaller types of Placemaking activities can often help to improve a neighborhood and make it a better place to live, work and play.

For larger Placemaking activities that support land-use activities, i.e., Better Block or Main Street projects, associations can apply for a Smart Growth grant.